The Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
The University of Georgia

1999-2000 Canola Performance Tests
Research Report Number 667
August 2000

   

The Season

Canola was not produced commercially in Georgia for the first time in more than 10 years. Although many farmers were interested in producing canola during 1999-2000, they were discouraged from doing so because local crushers did not commit to buying and processing the crop.

Extremely dry weather persisted throughout the 1999-2000 growing season. Monthly rainfall amounts recorded at the five test locations during the 1999-2000 season are presented in the table below. Total seasonal rainfall amounts at all test locations were well below normal.

 

1999-2000 Rainfall1

Month
Year
Calhoun2
Griffin
Midville
Plains
Tifton
October 1999
2.97"
3.69"
4.27"
1.93"
0.73"
November 1999
1.80"
3.55"
1.49"
2.08"
1.26"
December 1999
1.12"
2.73"
1.64"
2.83"
2.32"
January 2000
3.69"
5.70"
4.98"
3.41"
3.34"
February 2000

1.63"

0.96"
1.08"
0.96"
1.90"
March 2000

3.58"

3.17"
4.83"
5.72"
4.72"
April 2000

5.04"

1.31"
0.85"
1.24"
1.32"
May 2000

1.07"

1.51"
1.18"
0.31"
0.03"
June 2000
2.53"
2.31"
3.30"
5.32"
2.99"
Total (9 months)
23.43"
24.93"
23.62"
23.80"
18.61"
Normal (9 months)
41.90"
37.68"
32.11"
36.27"
32.51"
1 Data collected by Dr. G. Hoogenboom, Georgia Station, Griffin, GA
2 Floyd County location

The 1999-2000 canola growing season, one of the best in recent years, was characterized by a relatively dry growing season with mild winter temperatures. Although precipitation was well below normal, rainfall was timely and adequate to maintain growth and development of the crop at most test locations. Limited rainfall during the fall and early winter reduced nutrient leaching and most of the applied nitrogen remained available for plant uptake. Mild winter temperatures combined with high nitrogen availability stimulated excessive late winter growth that led to severe early-season lodging at Tifton and late-season lodging at Plains. Seed yields at Tifton were greatly reduced by early lodging while the Plains trials set new records with many varieties yielding 80-90 bushels per acre.

The warm fall and mild winter favored development of aphids, therefore trials at most locations required treatment with insecticides for aphid control. Cabbage seedpod weevil levels were significant at both the Griffin and Calhoun locations and required treatment with insecticides to minimize yield losses. Phoma blackleg was observed for the first time at the Tifton location and caused early season lodging in highly susceptible varieties. Incidence of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was minimal this growing season as was damage from other pests.

Return to Contents